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AACR Congratulates 35 Recipients of the Minority-serving Institution Faculty Scholar in Cancer Research Awards

March 20, 2012
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CHICAGO — The American Association for Cancer Research will recognize leaders in the minority cancer community with the Minority-serving Institution Faculty Scholars in Cancer Research Awards. The 35 recipients will be honored at the AACR Annual Meeting 2012, held here March 31 – April 4.

The Minority-serving Institution Faculty Scholars in Cancer Research Awards are given to scientists who are working at the level of assistant professor or above at a minority-serving institution and who are engaged in meritorious basic, clinical, translational or epidemiological cancer research. Minority-serving institutions include historically black colleges and universities, Hispanic-serving institutions, American Indian tribally controlled colleges and universities, and other post-secondary institutions defined as minorities-serving by the U.S. Department of Education.  

The award is intended to increase the scientific knowledge base of faculty members at minority-serving institutions, to encourage them in their research and to assist in inspiring their students to pursue careers in cancer research. It is supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute’s Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities.

The recipients of the 2012 Minority-serving Institution Faculty Scholars in Cancer Research Awards include:

  • Tiffany W. Ardley, Ph.D., Florida A&M University College of Pharmacy, Tallahassee, Fla.
    Abstract #3903. Synthesis of substituted N-{4-[(2-hydroxyethyl)sulfanyl]-3,6-dihydropyridin-1(2h)-yl} benzamide/benzenesulfonamide as anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents;
  • Zhenbang Chen, Ph.D., Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn.;
  • Mahavir B. Chougule, Ph.D., University of Hawaii at Hilo College of Pharmacy, Hilo, Hawaii
    Abstract #5644. Targeted nanocarriers of siRNA for the treatment of cancer;
  • Laronna S. Colbert, M.D., Morehouse School of Medicine, Decatur, Ga.
    Abstract #80. Differential expression of NILCO reveals pathogenesis of human breast cancer;
  • Oswald D’Auvergne, Ph.D., Southern University, Baton Rouge, La.
    Abstract #280. Genetics and functions of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) glycoproteins in virion egress, infectivity and tumorigenesis;
  • Sakina E. Eltom, D.V.M., Ph.D., Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn.
    Abstract #698. Overexpression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor correlates with high tumor grade in human breast invasive carcinomas;
  • Tamar Ginossar, Ph.D., University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N.M.;
  • Shanchun Guo, Ph.D., M.D., Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga.
    Abstract #5297. Autocrine stimulation of VEGFR-2 by leptin is associated with Notch signaling pathway and cancer stem cell marker expression;
  • Cimona V. Hinton, Ph.D., Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga.
    Abstract #538. ROS differentially regulates prostate cancer cell survival;
  • Offiong F. Ikpatt, M.D., Ph.D., University of Miami, Miramar, Fla.;
  • Efe Williams Iyamu, M.D., Ph.D., Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn.
    Abstract #1627. Chloroquine-induced inhibition of Arginase-1 promotes the nuclear localization of p53 in colon cancer cell lines;
  • Kimberly M. Jackson, Ph.D., Spelman College, Atlanta, Ga.;
  • Khosrow Kashfi, Ph.D., City University of New York Medical School, New York, N.Y.
    Abstract #3898. NOSH compounds: Nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrids, a new class of anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals;
  • Dae Joon Kim, Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
    Abstract #2537. UVB irradiation induces nuclear translocation of TC-PTP in keratinocytes;
  • Lilia Kucheryavykh, Ph.D., University Central del Caribe, Bayamon, Puerto Rico
    Abstract #318. Microglia promote glioma cell migration through a Pyk2 signaling pathway;
  • Nazarius Lamango, Ph.D., Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, Fla.
    Abstract #1843. Overexpression of polyisoprenylated methylated protein methyl esterase in triple-negative breast cancer;
  • TinChung Leung, Ph.D., North Carolina Central University, Kannapolis, N.C.
    Abstract #4255. Natural product ginger promotes hematopoietic recovery;
  • Magaly Martinez-Ferrer, Ph.D., University of Puerto Rico Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Juan, Puerto Rico
    Abstract #590. Andrographolide suppresses prostate cancer cell migration and alters the expression of vimentin, ZO-1 and MMP-11;
  • Amosy E. M’Koma, M.D., Ph.D., M.S., Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn.
    Abstract #2058. Macrophage engulfment of erythrocytes releases free heme iron, a possible transforming factor in ulcerative colitis-related colorectal cancer;
  • Shane Young Morita, M.D., University of Hawaii/The Queen’s Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii
    Abstract #3591. Triple-negative (c-KIT, BRAF, NRAS) acral lentiginous melanoma in Hawaii: Molecular profiling in a multi-ethnic population;
  • Valerie Odero-Marah, Ph.D., Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga.
    Abstract #5332. Snail transcription factor contributes to prostate cancer tumor progression via reactive oxygen species and Rac1 activation;
  • Yvette C. Paulino, Ph.D., University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam;
  • Carlos Perez-Stable, Ph.D., University of Miami VA Medical Center, Miami, Fla.
    Abstract #4679. Betulinic acid inhibits deubiquitinases to increase the degradation of pro-survival proteins and enhance prostate cancer-specific apoptosis;
  • James E. Raynor Jr., Ph.D., Fayetteville State University, Fayetteville, N.C.;
  • Checo J. Rorie, Ph.D., North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, N.C.
    Abstract #4908. The apoptotic response of the triple-negative breast cancer cell line HCC1806 to chemotherapeutics;
  • Pothana Saikumar, Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas;
  • Amos M. Sakwe, Ph.D., Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn.
    Abstract #5313. Sustained hypercalcemia primes noninvasive breast cancer cells for metastasis to high-calcium microenvironments;
  • Rajesh Singh, Ph.D., Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga.
    Abstract #3649. Expression of CXCR5 and its natural ligand CXCL13 in ovarian cancer;
  • Shailesh Singh, Ph.D., Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga.
    Abstract #586. Withaferin-A inhibits prostate tumor growth by enhancing antitumor immune response;
  • Rajeshwar Rao Tekmal, Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
    Abstract #5753. Potential therapeutic use of ER beta modulators in treating endocrine therapy-resistant breast cancers;
  • Marta Torroella-Kouri, Ph.D., University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.
    Abstract #398. Tumor microenvironment imposes major alterations and profoundly shapes functional status of macrophages: Peritoneal and tumor-associated macrophages from tumor hosts are two very different subpopulations;
  • Pablo E. Vivas-Mejía, Ph.D., University of Puerto Rico Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Juan, Puerto Rico
    Abstract #1105. MicroRNAs and their target genes promote cisplatin resistance in epithelial ovarian cancer cells;
  • Leslie G. Wooten-Blanks, Ph.D., Claflin University, Orangeburg, S.C.;
  • Huan Xie, Ph.D., Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas
    Abstract #2889. Development of a novel nanoconstruct for tumor hypoxia photothermal therapy; and
  • XiaoHe Yang, Ph.D., M.D., North Carolina Central University, Kannapolis, N.C.
    Abstract #548. Erythropoietin promotes mammary tumor development in MMTV-erbB-2 transgenic mice.
# # #

Press registration for the AACR Annual Meeting 2012 is free to qualified journalists and public information officers: www.aacr.org/PressRegistration.

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About the AACR

Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is the world’s first and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research and its mission to prevent and cure cancer. AACR’s membership includes 34,000 laboratory, translational and clinical researchers; population scientists; other health care professionals; and cancer advocates residing in more than 90 countries. The AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise of the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, biology, diagnosis and treatment of cancer by annually convening more than 20 conferences and educational workshops, the largest of which is the AACR Annual Meeting with more than 18,000 attendees. In addition, the AACR publishes seven peer-reviewed scientific journals and a magazine for cancer survivors, patients and their caregivers. The AACR funds meritorious research directly as well as in cooperation with numerous cancer organizations. As the Scientific Partner of Stand Up To Cancer, the AACR provides expert peer review, grants administration and scientific oversight of individual and team science grants in cancer research that have the potential for patient benefit. The AACR actively communicates with legislators and policymakers about the value of cancer research and related biomedical science in saving lives from cancer.  

For more information about the AACR, visit www.AACR.org.

Media Contact:
Tara Yates
(215) 446-7110
Tara.Yates@aacr.org
In Chicago, March 31 – April 4:
(312) 528-8206

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