Skip to content

Language, Immigration Status of Hispanic Caregivers Impacted Care of Children With Cancer

October 28, 2012
Bookmark and Share


  • Caregivers may delay seeking care if they are illegal immigrants.
  • Language was a barrier to caregivers fully understanding treatment risks.
  • Clinical trial consent process may not be adequate for Spanish-speaking caregivers.

SAN DIEGO — Language barriers and the immigration status of caregivers appear to impact the care of Hispanic children with cancer and affect the experience of the families within the medical system, according to data presented at the Fifth AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities, held here Oct. 27-30, 2012.

“Ensuring good communication with patients and their families is as important as the actual therapy we give, regardless of what language is spoken,” said Mark Fluchel, M.D., assistant professor in the department of pediatrics, division of hematology-oncology at the University of Utah Primary Children’s Medical Center in Salt Lake City. “However, for families for whom there is a language and possibly a cultural barrier, extra care needs to be taken to make sure we are providing the best care possible.”

Fluchel and his colleagues conducted a study among the primary caregivers of pediatric patients with cancer who were being treated at the University of Utah. Forty-six participants completed Spanish surveys and 323 completed English surveys. Caregivers evaluated various aspects of the child’s care, such as how soon after recognizing a symptom they sought care, how satisfied they were with the care, and whether the child was in a clinical trial. The survey also assessed financial, emotional and language barriers to the child’s care.

More than 65 percent of the Spanish-speaking respondents, defined as any caregiver who reported Spanish as their primary language, reported problems with their ability to speak English. Seventy percent of Spanish-speaking respondents reported that at least one member of their household had “undocumented” legal status. Thirteen percent reported avoiding or delaying care due to their immigration status.

When asked whether the child was enrolled in a clinical trial, 70 percent of Spanish-speaking caregivers and 40 percent of English-speaking caregivers reported that the child was enrolled in a clinical trial. However, when the researchers verified this information, they found that 32 percent of the Spanish-speaking and 12 percent of the English-speaking caregivers were incorrect about the child’s enrollment. Researchers interpreted these findings as the caregivers not fully understanding the informed consent process.

More Spanish-speaking caregivers reported feeling that the potential side effects of therapy were not explained well compared with English speakers. However, Spanish-speaking participants were more satisfied with their child’s overall care.

Among Spanish-speaking participants, 37 percent reported feeling not fully understood by the oncology staff, and 22 percent reported that they had falsely claimed understanding the oncology staff because they were embarrassed that they did not speak English. Eleven percent reported being uncomfortable asking for an interpreter, and 33 percent felt that their child would have received better care if English was their first language.
 
“As is the case with English speakers as well, we cannot assume that everything we say is understood,” Fluchel said. “The most important thing we can do is to quickly establish a trusting relationship with patients and their families and make sure they are comfortable asking for clarification. Once that kind of relationship is established, I think communication errors are less likely.”

# # #

Follow the AACR on Twitter: @aacr #aacr
Follow the AACR on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/aacr.org

About the American Association for Cancer Research
Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is the world’s first and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research and its mission to prevent and cure cancer. AACR membership includes more than 34,000 laboratory, translational and clinical researchers; population scientists; other health care professionals; and cancer advocates residing in more than 90 countries. The AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise of the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, biology, diagnosis and treatment of cancer by annually convening more than 20 conferences and educational workshops, the largest of which is the AACR Annual Meeting with more than 17,000 attendees. In addition, the AACR publishes seven peer-reviewed scientific journals and a magazine for cancer survivors, patients and their caregivers. The AACR funds meritorious research directly as well as in cooperation with numerous cancer organizations. As the scientific partner of Stand Up To Cancer, the AACR provides expert peer review, grants administration and scientific oversight of team science and individual grants in cancer research that have the potential for near-term patient benefit. The AACR actively communicates with legislators and policymakers about the value of cancer research and related biomedical science in saving lives from cancer.

For more information about the AACR, visit www.AACR.org.

Media Contact:
Jeremy Moore
(215) 446-7109
Jeremy.Moore@aacr.org
In San Diego, Oct. 27-30:
(619) 358-6870

About these ads
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 69 other followers

%d bloggers like this: